Biomarkers Every Man Should Be Tracking

Biomarkers Every Man Should Be Tracking
Next Health Staff
|
June 3, 2024

Just as regularly reviewing your budget is needed to problems down the line, regular biomarker tracking ensures your health plan is on track for a secure and vibrant future. Here are the top biomarkers to monitor to ensure you are maximizing your vitality throughout your years:

Apolipoprotein B

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Apolipoprotein B is a protein found on LDL (bad cholesterol) and elevated levels can increase the risk for heart disease and attack. Monitoring Apolipoprotein B can be helpful in identifying individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, especially those with normal LDL levels.

Optimal levels of Apolipoprotein B are less than 90. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to develop a plan that can help manage Apolipoprotein B levels and reduce the risk of heart disease This can include lifestyle changes such as exercise, a healthy diet, and quitting smoking, as well as medications such as statins.

Hemoglobin A1C (HBA1C)

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Hemoglobin a1c levels measure your average sugar intake over the last three months. It is a prerequisite for determining your risk for diabetes. Any score higher than 5.2 causes our bodies to have higher levels of inflammation, predisposes us an accelerated aging process, and increases our chances of insulin resistance.

Maintaining a low HbA1C is critical for your long term health. Your goal should be to have a level of 5.2 or less. You should minimize as much as possible all forms of sugar from your diet. Sugar is found in high levels in processed food, sodas, juices, and desserts. Refined carbohydrates also causes high insulin levels which can lead to many metabolic diseases, so you should also limit your intake of white breads, cereals, pastas and desserts.

Testosterone

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Testosterone, often associated primarily with male sexuality, is in fact a hormone of multifaceted importance. Beyond its role in sexual function, testosterone plays a critical role in various aspects of men's health, including heart health, bone density, energy levels, muscle mass, and more. However, as men age, they may experience a natural decline in testosterone levels, leading to a condition known as andropause, which mirrors the more well-known menopause in women.

Andropause typically begins to manifest in men in their mid-30s, with research indicating a gradual decline of about 1-2% in testosterone levels annually. By the time a man reaches his 40s, testosterone levels can plummet by nearly 40% compared to two decades prior. This decline can have significant consequences on overall health and well-being. Optimal levels of testosterone for men are above 500.

Symptoms of low testosterone, often mistakenly attributed to the normal aging process, can include hair loss, weight gain, decreased bone density, low energy levels, diminished libido, reduced physical performance, slower cognitive function, and more. It's crucial to recognize that these symptoms are not merely a byproduct of aging but indicative of low testosterone levels.

If your testosterone levels are low, it is important to maintain a healthy weight, get adequate sleep, do strength exercises 3-4 times a week. Plus, you may want to consider testosterone replacement with pellet or injectable therapy. Learn more here

Total PSA

A PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test serves as a crucial tool in the early detection of prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers affecting men. This screening method involves measuring the levels of PSA, a protein produced by the prostate gland, in the blood. Elevated PSA levels may indicate the presence of prostate cancer, although other factors such as age, ethnicity, and the size of the prostate gland can influence PSA levels.

Cancer screening, including PSA testing, plays a pivotal role in identifying signs of cancer before it progresses to a symptomatic stage. Detecting prostate cancer in its early stages significantly improves treatment outcomes and overall prognosis. Optimal PSA levels typically fall below 4.0 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL).

If you are over 40, annual PSA testing is recommended.

Vitamin D

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Vitamin D is actually a precursor hormone and plays a variety of critical roles in the endocrine system as well as the immune system, as well as reparative and restorative processes in the body. For optimal levels of sex hormones and a robust immune system, optimal levels of vitamin D are required. 70% of the population has suboptimal vitamin D levels. Insufficient levels of vitamin D can lead to fatigue, depression, bone pain, back pain, and weakness. In contrast, an excess of vitamin D can cause calcification in arteries, so it is important to check this marker frequently.

Your vitamin D level should be between 50-80. A low level is treated with increasing your intake (fish, eggs, mushrooms) and spending more time outside in the sun. Many people benefit from a Vitamin D3 supplement in dosages of 2500 - 5000 IU. You can also opt for a Vitamin D Shot for an instant boost in vitamin D.

Test The Above Markers & More With The Baseline Test

The Next Health Baseline Test checks over 50 key markers in your body to give you a clear picture of your health. With these insights, we create a personalized Next Health Wellness Plan to help you optimize your health and well-being.

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